Drilling the Coast: Trump’s Offshore Drilling Plan

By: Rachael Goldberg

On April 20th, 2010, the world witnessed the largest marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry, when the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig spilled 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

Eight years after this devastating disaster, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), under the U.S. Department of the Interior, is in the midst of developing a new five year Oil and Gas Leasing Program.   Read more…

L’eau Est La Vie: “The fight against the Black Snake moves south”

by Matthew Kennedy

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Only months ago, highly explosive crude oil began to flow through the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), or the Black Snake, as it was named by the Indigenous and allied activists at Standing Rock who organized massive opposition to its construction. The pipeline has since then leaked five times along its route. Proposals for dangerous new fossil fuel projects will continue to multiply, per the extremist deregulatory agenda of the Trump administration. But the fierce struggle for Lakota & Dakota territorial sovereignty (and rights for all Indigenous peoples, more broadly), together with the persistent legal confrontation of DAPL and the U.S. government, have left a formidable legacy for the coming years.

One of many testaments to this legacy is a “floating pipeline resistance camp” which has formed “in the swamps of Houma, Chitimacha, and Chata territory” in southern Louisiana to halt the expansion of a related Energy Transfer Partners scheme: the Bayou Bridge Pipeline (BBP). The BPP is the southernmost leg of DAPL. A new stretch of the BBP would carry fracked Bakken crude via Nederland, TX and Lake Charles, LA to terminals in St. James, LA. Anti-pipeline organizers, coming together in June of last year, have named their camp, L’eau Est La Vie, a cajun variation on the Water Protectors’ Lakota, mni wiconi, or “water is life.” An inaugural announcement from the Indigenous Environmental Network read:

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#NoDAPL calling party

Last night we organized a calling party at College of the Atlantic. We called banks, the White House, the US Army Corps, Safariland and other parties to continue the momentum of #NoDAPL movement.

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One of our members calling a bank, asking them
to divest from Energy Transfer and DAPL. 

 

The WHAT after Paris?

By Aura Silva Martinez

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There were over 160 people sitting in layers around a big, wide circle at the Climate Coalition 21 assembly. An ongoing wave of comments, questions and answers was being thrown to a multitude of unresponsive chairs. This was an overwhelming experience for me, and despite being a somewhat inefficient space where having a real, meaningful conversation was significantly difficult, it was here were many of my current thoughts about the future of the movement started to flourish. Read more…

A Message Home to the US: What Actually Happened at COP21

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by Morgan Heckerd

Over the past two weeks 196 governments have spent hours within consultation rooms and plenary halls in efforts of reaching an agreement. They are here in Paris because they know that the era of emissions need to come to an end. The urgency of climate change is no longer a concept that they can deny.

But– the developed countries have fallen short in adopting the demands of urgency. The Parties have demonstrated that they have heard the affirmations of science, equity and justice. The major issue is that these parties have failed to commit to ambitious contributions. They are willing to increase the global ambition (and call for 1.5º), but from that they have not declared that they will increase their own share to make up this gap. They may be prepared to follow a movement but they are certainly not prepared to lead it. The leadership will come from the millions of people around the world who know how drastic the reform must be.

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