Climate Change: a post-development and post-colonial exploration

My interest in climate justice has been constant through my four years at College of the Atlantic (COA). During my second, third and fourth years I was part of the COA delegations that attended the UN climate negations. In addition, I did my internship at the National University of Mexico in the Political and Social Sciences Faculty where I did research on different ways to promote renewable energy from a public policy perspective.

While attending these spaces, I realized that many of the so-called “climate solutions” assumed particular economic and political goals. It was easy to identify a strong developmental agenda engrained in the climate projects discussed, proposed, and financed at the UN space. With this in mind, for my undergraduate thesis (Senior Project) I decided to explore the UNFCCC discourse on Climate Solutions through the lenses of post-development and post-colonial theory. Read more…

Drilling the Coast: Trump’s Offshore Drilling Plan

By: Rachael Goldberg

On April 20th, 2010, the world witnessed the largest marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry, when the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig spilled 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

Eight years after this devastating disaster, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), under the U.S. Department of the Interior, is in the midst of developing a new five year Oil and Gas Leasing Program.   Read more…

L’eau Est La Vie: “The fight against the Black Snake moves south”

by Matthew Kennedy

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Only months ago, highly explosive crude oil began to flow through the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), or the Black Snake, as it was named by the Indigenous and allied activists at Standing Rock who organized massive opposition to its construction. The pipeline has since then leaked five times along its route. Proposals for dangerous new fossil fuel projects will continue to multiply, per the extremist deregulatory agenda of the Trump administration. But the fierce struggle for Lakota & Dakota territorial sovereignty (and rights for all Indigenous peoples, more broadly), together with the persistent legal confrontation of DAPL and the U.S. government, have left a formidable legacy for the coming years.

One of many testaments to this legacy is a “floating pipeline resistance camp” which has formed “in the swamps of Houma, Chitimacha, and Chata territory” in southern Louisiana to halt the expansion of a related Energy Transfer Partners scheme: the Bayou Bridge Pipeline (BBP). The BPP is the southernmost leg of DAPL. A new stretch of the BBP would carry fracked Bakken crude via Nederland, TX and Lake Charles, LA to terminals in St. James, LA. Anti-pipeline organizers, coming together in June of last year, have named their camp, L’eau Est La Vie, a cajun variation on the Water Protectors’ Lakota, mni wiconi, or “water is life.” An inaugural announcement from the Indigenous Environmental Network read:

Read more…

The 10 First Days of Trump

It has been 10 days since Donald Trump was inaugurated as the president of the US. Already, Trump has moved forward with some of the promises we secretly and openly hoped would never come true. Here are some of the major actions undertaken thus far by the new president; Read more…

#NoDAPL calling party

Last night we organized a calling party at College of the Atlantic. We called banks, the White House, the US Army Corps, Safariland and other parties to continue the momentum of #NoDAPL movement.

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One of our members calling a bank, asking them
to divest from Energy Transfer and DAPL.