“Water for Sustainable Growth” — What are we talking about here?

Guest blog by Galen Hecht

Report from World Water Week, Stockholm, August 28-September 2, 2016

“We need a circular economy,” a different model, one that defies the structures that our lawmakers are accustomed to. To achieve water security and sanitation, we need a model that will create self supporting systems, an economy based not on linear growth, but on natural cycles like that of water. This was the resounding message at the finale of World Water Week, spoken by Pablo Bereciartua, Argentina’s Undersecretary for Water Resources, and Torkil Jonch Clauser, of the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) who hosted the event.

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The Paris Agreement

guest blog by Daniel Voskoboynik, This Changes Everything UK

For all the dispiriting truths I know about the world, inside of me I still carry impulses of hopeful naiveté: that there are no bad intentions but misguided ones, that things are being constantly improved, that there are always saviours somewhere, that all problems find their cures. These intuitions, engraved in me through innocence and illusion, come and go, but never have they encountered such a direct challenge than during the two weeks I spent at the Paris climate talks.

Over the past weeks, I’ve struggled to make sense of the fallout of Paris. Beyond the assured opinion pieces and the neat narratives, lies an unsettled confusion about what we should understand, and what we should do next.

There is much to parse about the accord itself, and confident conclusions, encased in tidy turns of phrase, seem elusive. But below are a few stories and fragments that inadequately attempt to look back at what was decided, and what may lie ahead.

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Food Justice: What’s at Stake in Paris?

guest blog by Doreen Stabinsky, Professor of Global Environmental Politics at College of the Atlantic.

Five key fights at the UNFCCC:

The build-up to the December Paris climate summit is focusing world attention on the issue of climate change. In the process, there is significant opportunity to raise and highlight justice issues that lie at the intersection of climate change and food – for example, the fact that climate change will threaten the right to food, with the gravest impacts on the poorest and most vulnerable, through devastating impacts on food production. A second critical issue to highlight is the central role played by industrial systems of agricultural production in causing climate change, in particular through massive emissions from industrial meat production, production and use of synthetic chemical fertilizers, and large-scale monocultures of commodities shipped around the world.

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Justicia Climática e Interseccionalidad

* Artículo escrito y compilado por Majandra Rodriguez Acha (fb),una amiga y aliada del Peru. El Artículo fue publicado originalmente en TierrActiva Perú.

Las actividades, acciones y contenidos de TierrActiva Perú se basan en un enfoque de Justicia Climática e Interseccionalidad.

¿Qué es la Interseccionalidad?audre-lorde-portrait

La interseccionalidad se centra en cómo las categorías sociales como el género, la raza, la clase socio-, las habilidades diferentes, la orientación sexual, la religión, y otros ejes de identidad interactúan en múltiples niveles, contribuyendo a la discriminación, exclusión, desigualdad social e injusticia sistémica.

Asumir un enfoque de interseccionalidad busca visibilizar y abordar los diferentes privilegios y opresiones que tod@s tenemos, para construir un movimiento activista más justo, inclusivo y coherente.Como concepto, fue acuñado por Kimberlé Crenshaw en 1989, en el contexto de las luchas afro-feministas en EEUU. Read more…

10 things that are wrong with this approach to “equity”

Ever since our own Anjali Appadurai stood before world leaders at the 2011 Durban climate talks to demand “equity now,” echoing a longstanding demand of climate justice movements across the world, there has been an increasing use of the word in discussions on international climate change policy. The idea of equity is contested, as everyone from social movement leaders to former Heads of State tries to get a slice of the action. Everyone is touting their vision of how equity, and therefore climate justice, can be operationalized at the international level in the negotiation of a new global clime agreement. They’re trying to put in practice in 2015 what the Convention set out in principle in 1992. What many academics and advocates are attempting, at least nominally, is to figure out how to fairly determine each countries’ responsibility for emissions reductions in order to meet an aggregate global goal of emissions reductions that limits the planet to a safe[1] level of warming. Read more…