It’s not just about what we say: it’s about who is listening

by Andrea Fontana

Credits Aura Silva Martinez

Credits Aura Silva Martinez

First day at COP23. Having the chance to address the opening plenary of the Subsidiary Bodies at COP23 we frantically put together a statement on behalf of the coalition Climate Justice Now. Focusing on Loss and Damage and requesting developed countries to live up to their commitments to developing countries (don’t worry – nothing too radical here, just trying to have countries fulfill their commitments). Oh yeah, we also asked Parties to recognize the current losses and damages by climate change and to not rely on the private sector – read capitalism – to solve the climate crisis. Because #copitalismkills. Below is what my voice relayed on behalf of thousands of Climate Justice Now members:

Thank you chair, my name is Andrea Fontana, a member of Earth in Brackets and Climate Justice Now.

 Chairs, delegates

 With the losses of climate disasters stacking up year after year and with Typhoon Damrey currently wreaking havoc in Vietnam, it is impossible to ignore that losses and damages are being faced by communities right now. To give impacted peoples a fighting chance, we need the permanent incorporation of Loss and Damage into the agenda of the COP and SB meetings, and we need clarity on the 100-billion-dollar roadmap for real finance and support.

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Civil Society Demanding Urgent Action to Ensure Protection and Justice for Climate Migrants under the UNFCCC

by Andrea Fontana

On Thursday November 10th, civil society mobilized with a series of events to ask for legal protection and immediate action for climate migrants. The call to action was sparked from the fact that the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change does not offer legal protection for the average 21.5 million people that are displaced every year by the adverse impacts of climate change.

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Why do I [want to] work for climate justice?

Guest blog by Rebecca Haydu

When I ask myself this, I am met with more questions than answers. Where does positive change actually come from, and who decides what that looks like? What does it mean to engage in an international space like the United Nations as compared to working at home? Where does the movement for climate justice begin and end? How does someone like me fit in all of this? It’s easy to find a linear narrative of struggle and hope to latch onto, but much harder to face these nuances and complexities, to challenge even the narratives that we lean on as activists.

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A Message Home to the US: What Actually Happened at COP21

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by Morgan Heckerd

Over the past two weeks 196 governments have spent hours within consultation rooms and plenary halls in efforts of reaching an agreement. They are here in Paris because they know that the era of emissions need to come to an end. The urgency of climate change is no longer a concept that they can deny.

But– the developed countries have fallen short in adopting the demands of urgency. The Parties have demonstrated that they have heard the affirmations of science, equity and justice. The major issue is that these parties have failed to commit to ambitious contributions. They are willing to increase the global ambition (and call for 1.5º), but from that they have not declared that they will increase their own share to make up this gap. They may be prepared to follow a movement but they are certainly not prepared to lead it. The leadership will come from the millions of people around the world who know how drastic the reform must be.

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A Long Term Goal in the Paris Agreement: A Failure Without Differentiation & Equity

By Paige Nygaard

We are getting closer and closer to the end of COP21. Anticipation is growing to seeing what disaster will unfold within the text. Will it be slightly bad? Absolutely terrible? How much will the United States be able to shift the burden of climate change to other countries while also blaming them for any bad deal in Paris?

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